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College Weight Gain

A Heavy Burden on The Minds of Teens

The family is all abuzz. Jun will be home this summer, his first summer as a college man. My parents were so excited that they have already forgotten the visit they made to Jun’s dorm a month ago. Well, that’s the way parents are. Anyways, when Jun opened our front door and stepped into the house, everyone was on him almost immediately.

But amidst all the chatter, the smiles, the welcome home remarks, there was one comment that rang through the whole house. It was my niece saying “Boy, have you gotten fat.” Jun, fortunately, just brushed it off. However, to some people, college weight gain cannot be brushed off quite easily.

Studies have been undertaken on the issue of gaining weight during college. Although the truth of the matter has been confirmed quite a number of times, the actual reason behind the phenomenon is not as conclusive as other people might like.

Serious Mass Weight Gainer

College Weight Gain

It is said that the first year of one’s stay in college can easily result in a 10 or even a 20-pound increase in body weight. A number of reasons have been cited as the causes of getting a bigger butt while you’re in college. Actually, some of the clues that explain this phenomenon are really quite obvious, when you look at them closely.

One of the possible reasons is that they might overdo this concept of being free. Some students or most students see their first year in college as their chance to be free from their parents. Although, some might handle this quite well adapting to the school and his/her peers. They lose control and eat and drink whatever they want and whenever they want.

They don’t concern themselves with their diet. Compared to when their mom was in control of what they eat, these first-year college folks drown themselves in sodas and fill their bellies with junk foods. The school cafeteria is also an easy place to stuff more fat since the food there is oftentimes “complete.” With appetizers, main courses, and most especially desserts, college folks are more likely to overeat there than in any other place on campus.

One interesting thing is that according to recent studies, college males are more likely to gain considerable weight after the first year of their stay in college than their female counterparts. So guys, beware. If you continue with your current lifestyle, you might end up four times or even six times your body weight before you leave college.

Another reason that kept getting the blame for this college fat phenomenon is the fact that most college folks live a more or less sedentary life. If eating the right food is the least of their concern, believe me, exercising is further off their grid. They have homework, study groups, library work, experiments, and not to mention parties to go to, events to crash, and so on.

Speaking of parties, the various gathering you go to in college serves mostly fat-laden finger foods, sodas, and the like. Imagine the fat you will gain the next day. In the attempt to socialize with their peers, college freshmen are eating more than enough fills of fats, salt, and other junk.

Stopping college weight gain is a conscious effort. College folks need to get their diet in order and need to get their butt off their bunks. This is an action that they themselves need to initiate. Complaining won’t do them any good. They need to fight this with sheer willpower and utter determination.

Primal Gains

DISCLAIMER:

This information is not presented by a medical practitioner and is for educational and informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read.
Since natural and/or dietary supplements are not FDA-approved they must be accompanied by a two-part disclaimer on the product label: that the statement has not been evaluated by FDA and that the product is not intended to “diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.”

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